Finnish Delicacies, part I

Ok, I’m going to introduce two delicacies now: hapankaali and raejuusto! I just brought some home from the supermarket.

First goes Hapankaali. This Finnish version of Sauerkraut strongly divides opinions. When I opened the box of the treat just now, my boyfriend’s first reaction was to throw away this strong smelling so-called food. So, the photo shooting was very fast.

Actually sauerkraut is not especially a Finnish delicacy, but it’s very popular here and has variations: hapankaali (sour cabbage) with garlic, with leek, carrot etc. In Germany it’s normally eaten with sausage.

Why is the taste so “special”? The cabbage is fermented with lactic acid bacteria – which is very healthy! Sauerkraut contains vitamins and lots of other good stuff.  They say it also has many cancer-fighting ingredients.

Haha, and a curiosity: while I was looking for the English translation for sauerkraut I found out that during the World War I the American public would have rejected a product with a German name, so it was relabeled as “Liberty cabbage”!

And then the second delicacy. Raejuusto is a Finnish cheese. It looks a bit like cottage cheese and is made of cow’s milk. I call it the cheese without taste, but I love it! It’s almost fat-free and very healthy as it contains loads of protein. You can eat it as such (directly from the box, as I do) or mix it with e.g. tuna, fruits, lasagna or  soup – only sky is the limit when it comes to The Cheese Without Taste.

Mmm… I will talk of other Finnish treats like salmiakki a little later on…

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